Unity Ceremonies

HANDFASTING: AN ANCIENT RITUAL

There are many rituals that have lasted centuries that symbolize a couples love and commitment. The handfasting ceremony dates back to the time of the ancient Celts. It was used to acknowledge the beginning of a trial period of a year and a day during which time a couple were literally bound together - hand fasted. It was however a temporary agreement which could be made permanent after the trial period if both parties agreed.

Nowadays, the handfasting ceremony is only used symbolically. The bride and groom’s hands are joined together, usually holding hands so the wrists and pulses are touching, with a ribbon or symbolic material looped over the bride and groom’s wrists and tied by the celebrant or a friend.
             

The words spoken usually express that the couple are bound by their love and commitment for one another and like the cord, which has two individual ends, they are two individuals. Yet, in essence, they are one.

The bride and groom usually remain joined by the looped ribbon until after the marriage vows are exchanged - not for a year and a day! The final tie being done loosely so the ribbon/s can be removed easily while still remaining tied.

LASSO CEREMONY: AN HISPANIC TRADITION

The Lasso is a wedding ritual in which the couple are bound together with a ceremonial ribbon. Lassoing is a declaration of intent, where the bride and groom clearly state that they are marrying of their own free will.

Lasso (sometimes called, "lazo") or rope is placed around the bride and groom's shoulders (groom's shoulder's first) in the form of an "8" (the infinity symbol) - after they have exchanged their vows - to symbolize their everlasting union. This is usually done by the officiant, however, family members can also take part in this ritual. The couple wears the lasso throughout the remainder of the service.

It is sometimes made of rosary beads, white ribbon, orange flowers, fabric, silver, crystal or elaborately painted wood. It can also be placed around the couple's necks, or wrists. If you have children; they may also be included as they will definitely be a part of the new family. at the end of the ceremony, the lasso is removed by the same people who put it on and given to the couple as a memento.